How Soon Is Too Soon to Start Testing for ADHD?

Available for Interviews: John Rodriguez, MD

Dr. John Rodriguez is a Chief Medical Officer of Healthcare2U, and he is passionate about the care that is provided to their patients. He manages all the care providers in Healthcare2U’s network of clinics and oversees care protocols and training.

What Dr. Rodriguez can say in an interview about
ADHD:

ADHD, or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, is one of the most common mental disorders affecting children. It can be a truly debilitating illness for some, depending on the severity. Now that people are realizing that mental health is just as important as physical health, why don’t we start testing sooner?

Here are some of the points that are important
when discussing testing for ADHD:
    1.   Symptoms
    2.   Testing before it becomes more unmanageable
    3.   Medications
    4.   Therapy and other coping mechanisms that don’t involve drugs

Symptoms

Sometimes the warning signs can be difficult to separate from what may seem like “typical” behavior in children, but the deciding factor is whether it’s just a nuisance at times or a problem that truly affects a child’s ability to function in society. The biggest symptoms of ADHD are the inability to focus, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.¹ We’ve all probably had those symptoms at one time, but when it becomes unmanageable and halts one from completing simple daily tasks, then it’s an issue and needs to be properly addressed.

Getting tested and diagnosed

Early detection can greatly help your child with coping with ADHD but remember—only a licensed medical professional can diagnose someone with a mental illness—do NOT take it upon yourself to try and diagnose without one. Therapists can diagnose your child, and psychologists can prescribe your child medication to treat their ADHD if that’s something you want to do.

Medications—are they right for everyone?

 Some parents are concerned about starting their child off with medication too early, which is completely understandable. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that before the age of 6, your child should not take medication. Instead, you should start them off with behavior therapy.²

If your child is over the age of 6 and you’re comfortable giving them medication, you need to be aware that ADHD medication is not a “one-size-fits-all” situation.² Of course, like every medication, there are side effects. The comedown of a stimulant can be difficult to manage, children can “crash” and become depressed at the end of the day if the medication has worn off. Therefore, it’s important, especially during this stage, to monitor your child’s behavior closely and talk to them about how they’re feeling. It is also imperative, that your child is prescribed medication by a licensed therapist or psychologist, that way they can monitor your child’s progress.

Therapy and other
natural coping mechanisms

Another alternative to ADHD medication is therapy. Dealing with this illness can be difficult for a parent who has no prior experience. A therapist can speak with your child about coping mechanisms that can greatly help them manage their ADHD.

A therapist will probably recommend this, but another way to help your child cope with ADHD is through extra-curricular activities. This includes activities that require physicality or creativity; mainly activities that allow a child to focus on one thing as opposed to several at a time.

Dealing with ADHD can be difficult, but the best way to handle it is by simply getting your child tested. It’s better to know what you’re facing and deal with it head-on than to wonder and have your child possibly suffer as a result.

 

Interview: John Rodriguez, MD

Dr. John Rodriguez is a Chief Medical Officer of Healthcare2U, and he is passionate about the care that is provided to their patients. He manages all the care providers in Healthcare2U’s network of clinics and oversees care protocols and training.

Dr. Rogriguez co-founded Healthcare2U to ensure that organizations of all sizes and structures have unlimited, nationwide access to affordable and consistent primary and urgent care. He has over 20 years of experience, where he worked in private practice as an attending physician with one of the most prestigious healthcare systems in the country, Baylor Health Care Systems. Dr. Rodriguez and his company have been featured on Fox News Channel’s Fox & Friends, and in publications like BenefitsPro, America’s Benefit Specialist, and Broker World.

Contact:
Jo Allison
Managing Editor
Director of Public Relations
MEDIA AMBASSADORS
Success In Media, Inc.
Jo@SuccessInMedia.com

 

 

Sources:

¹Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) – Symptoms – NHS (www.nhs.uk)

²ADHD: Can You Treat It Without Drugs? (webmd.com)

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