Avoiding Court and Litigation When Getting Divorced

Available for Interviews: Teddi Ann Barry

Teddy Ann Barry, Esq. is a family attorney and writer and has been serving families through divorce and custody and has been practicing family law for over twenty years, and also comes with a wealth of experience in mediation and collaborative law.

What Teddi Ann Barry can say in an interview on
Avoiding Court & Litigation When Getting Divorced
: 

    • Divorce is one of the most emotional events a person can experience. In fear, in despair, and often complete devastation people are often reacting and working from a place of confusion and anger.  This may lead to hiring the wrong attorney, not consulting experts before signing agreements, or failing to act when you should.

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Financial Education and the Wealth Gap

Available for Interviews: Chris Janeway

Chris Janeway is Founder & CEO Fourth Point Wealth and coaches investors throughout southern CA.  He is also a national speaker, financial coach, and advocate for financial literacy.

What Chris Janeway can say in an interview about
Financial Education and the Wealth Gap:

    • The socio-economic wealth gap is clear by age 15 according to the PISA Study by Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (well before these teenagers started their financial lives). The 2019 study took measures of economic, social, and cultural status rather than simply household income averages for a particular school. 

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Why Do the “Mens” Want to Go Back to the Office So Bad? 

Available for Interviews: Dr. Hope Umansky

Dr. Hope Umansky is an American Culture College Professor with a PhD in Clinical Psychology. She is also an author on educational reform, equity, inclusion, and social justice.

What Dr. Hope can say in an interview on
Gender Roles in the Old & New Workplace:

That group is what I characterize as the “mens”; it is decidedly not a typo. The mens, utilizing the definition in the Time article, are itching to get out of the “kid and home sphere” where it is clean, less sticky, where time means something (I have a meeting at 1 don’t bother me; 12:55 pm– “MOMMM, the cat threw up all over your desk!”—in this world of WFH time is fluid. Meetings are not so much scheduled as let’s put it down and I hope no one gets sick; we’ll hope for the best.

According to the recent Time magazine article, “Nobody Wants to Go Back to the Office As Much As White Men,” the men they are speaking about are the definition of boomer or near boomer age white men who enjoy a level of privilege in the corporate muckety-mucky. The last two-plus years of the men’s seeing the world of children (often still too often the domain of women and primary child caregivers).

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3 Ways to Legally Protect Your Child During Divorce

Available for Interviews: Teddy Ann Barry

Teddy Ann Barry, Esq. is a family attorney and writer and has been serving families through divorce and custody and has been practicing family law for over twenty years, and also comes with a wealth of experience in mediation and collaborative law.

What Teddy Ann Barry can say in an interview on
Protecting Your Children During Divorce
:

So often we’re asked when does my child get to talk to the Judge? The Family Court will rarely question your child about what he wants to have happen or where she wants to live.

If parents cannot agree on a parenting plan or strongly disagree with what is in their child’s best interests, here are some ways to legally protect your child:

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3 Techniques to Apply Mindful Parenting

Available for Interviews: Dr. Pete Loper

Dr. Pete Loper, MD, MSEd, FAAP, is a triple board-certified physician in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry. He is also a professor and executive coach and is dedicated to mental health and wellness advocacy.

What Dr. Loper could say on
Mindful Parenting:

  • Put simply, mindfulness is being fully present where your feet are on the ground. Instead of perseverating on the past, or worrying about the future, mindfulness is an active practice of being fully present with one’s thoughts and feelings at the moment. 
  • Mindful parenting is the practice of supporting and responding to your child instead of dictating and reacting to emotions.  It’s about acceptance of the “here and now,” without judgment and as it comes, instead of trying to alter or escape from it.  

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Supporting Our Children’s Emotional Intelligence & Empathy

Available for Interviews: Dr. Colleen Cira

Dr. Colleen Cira, PsyD, is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist as well as the Founder and Executive Director of the Cira Center for Behavioral Health. She is an anxiety and trauma expert as well as a consultant, supervisor, speaker, writer, and advocate.

What Dr. Colleen Cira can say in an interview about
Supporting Your Child’s EQ & Empathy:

Dr. Cira has worked with hundreds of people struggling to parent the way they’d ideally like to. There are several ways that you can increase your child’s emotional intelligence and empathy.

        1. You must have empathy yourself. The most effective way that kids learn is by watching the way their parents behave. If YOU, the parent, have and demonstrate empathy, your children will grow up to be empathic. Give money to homeless folks, check in on friends, family, and neighbors who are ill and/or struggling, take your child to a peaceful, family-friendly protest, volunteer at a food bank together. SHOW UP the way you’d like your child to show up someday.
        2. You must accept your child’s emotions. This sounds easy but is not. It’s hard to see our children hurting—we’re actually biologically programmed to struggle to tolerate it. We want to make it better for them if they are sad. We want to make it go away if they are angry. But in order for our kids to learn how to accept other people’s feelings as they are, we have to teach them how to accept THEIR OWN feelings and the only way to do that is when WE accept their feelings. Let your kids experience big feelings without fixing or punishing.
        3. When your kid has an absolute meltdown about something, once they’re calm, talk it through with them. When your child is freaking out about something big or small, that is NOT the time to try to reason with them. Validate their feelings at the moment (that does NOT mean give them whatever they want), help and/or let them calm down, and then ask them to talk through everything that happened, just like they’re telling a story. Have them tell you the beginning, middle, and end and what they learned from it. See our children’s brains are not fully developed and won’t be for a long time (think mid-20’s – GASP!) which includes the connectivity between the two hemispheres. When you help tie a child’s emotional response to a rational (and verbal) response, you help them develop their brain in a way that honors their emotions but also increases their rationality.
        4. Talk about feelings. Your kid doesn’t show up in the world knowing when they are sad, scared, angry, or worried. YOU have to teach them that. The only way to have empathy—an understanding and acceptance of another’s feelings—is by having an understanding and acceptance of your own feelings. This means you need to know what the heck you’re feeling! There are subtle differences between sadness and grief. Anger and frustration. Anxiety and fear. Help your child start to learn those things and tease them apart by labeling and talking about feelings. Share your own feelings. Take a guess at what they’re feeling and believe them when they say it’s not that. When you read books or watch movies together, encourage them to speculate on how the characters are feeling or what they are thinking. All of these things encourage 1) feeling identification and 2) perspective taking both of which are required for empathy.

 

Interviews: Dr. Colleen Cira

Dr. Colleen Cira, PsyD, received both her Masters and Doctorate from The Illinois School of Professional Psychology and is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in the State of Illinois.  She’s the Founder and Executive Director of Cira Center for Behavioral Health, PC, a boutique group practice specializing in Women and Trauma with locations in Chicago and Oak Park.

She was named one of the “Top 100 Women in Chicago Making a Difference,” by Today’s Chicago Woman. Dr. Cira is a trauma and anxiety expert, clinical supervisor, writer, speaker, consultant, activist, wife, and Mommy to two little ones.

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3 Essential Money Tips to Teach Your Kids

Available for Interviews: Chris Janeway

Chris Janeway is Founder & CEO Fourth Point Wealth and coaches investors throughout southern CA.  He is also a national speaker, financial coach, and advocate for financial literacy.

What Chris Janeway can say in an interview about
Imparting Financial Education to Our Children:

tip #1 Teach the Value of Money 

Kids are much smarter than we give them credit for. They absorb everything around them, most notably, our own activities and interactions. The absolute key to raising a financially successful future adult is making sure kids understand that money is earned. When they see us swipe the credit card and move on or push a button to get cash at the ATM, they don’t connect with what it took to earn the money in the first place. By placing value around the work we do and encouraging children to do the same, our kids start to think about purchases in terms of work. They become more discerning in their decisions and less prone to waste.

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5 Strategies to Help Our Sleep-Deprived Adolescents Get More Zzzs

Available for Interviews: Dr. Pete Loper

Dr. Pete Loper, MD, MSEd, FAAP, is a triple board-certified physician in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry. He is also a professor and executive coach and is dedicated to mental health and wellness advocacy.

What Dr. Loper could say on
Adolescents and Sleep
:

Between changing hormones, changing bodies, and navigating the pitfalls of burgeoning independence, adolescence is a very challenging time. Throw in socially prescribed perfectionism and the uncertainty of an ongoing pandemic, being a teenager is more challenging than ever. Resilience, or our teenagers’ capacity to process their distress, move forward, and develop, is contingent upon meaningful interpersonal interactions embedded in the context of a community. This is where getting enough quality sleep comes in.

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The 21st Century Digital Playground: Protecting Our Most Vulnerable Teens on Social Media

Available for Interviews: Dr. Hope Umansky

Dr. Hope Umansky is an American Culture College Professor with a PhD in Clinical Psychology.

A continuation of the Facebook/Instagram story and the internal conspiracy where workers concerned cannot speak out. American Culture professor can talk about the biggest threat—our female teenagers—and where this might be taking us as a country.

What Dr. Hope can say in an interview in the
Continuation of the Facebook/Instagram Story:

Even as Instagram was heralded as one of Facebook’s crown jewels, it turned to extraordinary spending measures to get the attention of teenagers. It particularly emphasized a category called “early high school,” which it classified as 13-to 15-year-olds. Targeting such a vulnerable population is in itself problematic, but now that the whistle has been blown in Congress, what can be done?

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Kids & Smartphones: Text Neck Concerns

Available for Interviews:  Dr. Jason Deitch

Jason Deitch, is a Doctor of Chiropractic, author, international speaker, and social media expert. He speaks on health & wellness trends and the role of chiropractic care in family wellness. He is also the best-selling author of Discover Wellness: How Staying Healthy Can Make You Rich. 

What Dr. Deitch can say in an interview on Text Neck:

    • “Text neck” has become a modern problem due to the rise in use in computers, laptops, and handheld devices—especially smartphones. Millions of children are walking around and looking down at their smartphones for far too long, becoming victims of text neck.
    • The increase in the use of computers in school and access to smartphones (even at school) has led to a lifestyle of teens looking down. This is becoming a danger to their health & well-being.

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