The Pandemic Is Gone, So Why Do I Still Feel Anxious and Depressed?

Available for Interviews: John Rodriguez, MD

Dr. John Rodriguez is a Chief Medical Officer of Healthcare2U, and he is passionate about the care that is provided to their patients. He manages all the care providers in Healthcare2U’s network of clinics and oversees care protocols and training.

What Dr. Rodriguez can say in an interview about
the Reasons Why We Delay Medical Care:

The COVID-19 Pandemic led to a huge jump in rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide, more than tripling the previous rates. One study out of The Lancet showed current rates of depression in 2021 at 32.8% of the general population.* The concern was that from 2020 to 2021 the rates were climbing, despite the loosening of pandemic lockdown rules. Unfortunately, once anxiety and depression are ‘let out of the bag’ they are hard to control.

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Adaptability Is Essential for Mental Health. Here Are 3 Ways to Improve at Home and Work

Available for Interviews: Dr. Pete Loper

Dr. Pete Loper, MD, MSEd, FAAP, is a triple board-certified physician in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry. He is also a professor and executive coach and is dedicated to mental health and wellness advocacy.

What Dr. Loper could say on
Adaptability & Mental Health:

Adaptability Is Important to Mental Health

Life is dynamic and constantly changing. Consequently, human beings have evolved to be dynamic, kinetic creatures, who from the time we are born until we die are in a perpetual state of adaptation and development. We were not the strongest, fastest, or biggest land-dwelling creatures, but we are now the dominant species on earth by virtue of our capacity to develop and adapt. Adaptability is not only important, but it is also vital for mental health and overall well-being.

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Taking Must-Needed Social Media Breaks for Well-Being

Available for Interviews: Dr. Pete Loper

Dr. Pete Loper, MD, MSEd, FAAP, is a triple board-certified physician in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry. He is also a professor and executive coach and is dedicated to mental health and wellness advocacy.

What Dr. Loper could say on
Social Media:

82% of the US population currently uses social media.  However, as a psychiatrist, I have observed first-hand the negative impact of excessive social media use on my patients’ mental health and well-being. I have published my observations on this topic in Medscape and Current Psychiatry (please see links below). These are the talking points that I have found most effective when educating my patients, regardless of age, about the necessity of taking a “social media break”:

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Walking Just Two Minutes After a Meal Can Help Prevent Illness

Available for Interviews: John Rodriguez, MD

Dr. John Rodriguez is a Chief Medical Officer of Healthcare2U, and he is passionate about the care that is provided to their patients. He manages all the care providers in Healthcare2U’s network of clinics and oversees care protocols and training.

What Dr. Rodriguez can say in an interview about
Walking and Health:

We’ve heard the age-old tale that walking after eating helps digestion, but researchers have found that it can reduce glucose levels by up to 17%.*

When you eat, your blood sugar levels spike. This is a completely normal event called a postprandial spike. This triggers the release of insulin, which enables the glucose to enter your cells which is then used for energy.** Now, doctors say you could drastically reduce these glucose levels by walking for a few minutes after eating. They’ve even gone as far as to say that merely standing can help as well, citing it could reduce levels on average by 9.51%.*

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5 Ways to Best Support the Mental Health of a Loved One

Available for Interviews: Dr. Pete Loper

Dr. Pete Loper, MD, MSEd, FAAP, is a triple board-certified physician in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry. He is also a professor and executive coach and is dedicated to mental health and wellness advocacy.

What Dr. Loper could say on
Supporting the Mental Well-being of Loved Ones:

We need better strategies and tools to support best our loved ones who may be experiencing mental health challenges. Here are five ways we can help:

    1.  The best way to support someone living with a mental illness is to be fully present, engaged, and available for them.
    2.  The concept of “befriending,” or engaging in consistent, meaningful interpersonal interactions, is an evidence-based intervention to support those with mental illness, particularly those suffering from depression. 
    3. Continue reading “5 Ways to Best Support the Mental Health of a Loved One”

8 Great Ways to Boost Mindfulness During the Holidays

Interview: Dr. Mimi Secor.

Dr. Mimi is a fitness and health advocate who is passionate about helping women to lose weight and feel great, and is the author of Healthy & Fit at Any Age: A Guide to Creating nutrition, exercise, and mindset habits for busy women!

What Dr. Secor Can Say in an Interview on
Mindfulness and the Holidays:

The holidays are a wonderful time of the year, but also the busiest and sometimes the most stressful time, too. Interview Dr. Mimi Secor to discuss ways we can all practice mindfulness to reduce stress and be happy and share and affect others in more positive ways.

  1. Be Creative. Getting lost in any arts and crafts taps into our human creativity reduces stress, and recharges us so we can be more empathetic with ourselves and others.
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Arrested Development: Debunking the Myth About What Causes Burnout

Available for Interviews: Dr. Pete Loper

Dr. Pete Loper, MD, MSEd, FAAP, is a triple board-certified physician in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry. He is also a professor and executive coach and is dedicated to mental health and wellness advocacy.

What Dr. Loper could say on
Human Development & Burnout:

Whether you are getting in arguments with colleagues, taking 3-hour lunch breaks, regularly calling out sick, or quitting your job, burnout manifests as a series of avoidance, withdrawal, and acting out behaviors.  With this in mind, burnout is simply maldevelopment.  If we understand burnout as maldevelopment, then by definition, we can understand that burnout is caused by an insufficiency in one of the 3 core ingredients required for healthy human development.  

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Why We Need Emotional Intelligence for Academic Achievement

Available for Interviews:  Nadine Levitt

Nadine Levitt is an education advocate, speaker, and the CEO & Founder of WURRLYedu, an educational technology platform. Nadine specializes in the social-emotional curriculum (SEL), and she is also the author of the children’s book, My Mama Says Inside Me Lives a Village. 

What Nadine Levitt can say
Emotions and Academic Achievement:

There has been a tremendous focus on the declining academic achievement of students since the start of the pandemic, as well as a rise in issues relating to mental health and well-being. But the link between the two is not often talked about.

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3 Evidence-Based Ways to Reduce Stress

Available for Interviews: Dr. Pete Loper

Dr. Pete Loper, MD, MSEd, FAAP, is a triple board-certified physician in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry. He is also a professor and executive coach and is dedicated to mental health and wellness advocacy.

What Dr. Loper could say on
Reducing Stress:

The stress response, or the physiologic changes to include the release of “adrenaline” that promote fight, flight, or freeze behaviors in response to a threat, are very important for our survival. However, our stress-response system is designed to activate briefly, for only about 10 to 15 minutes, just long enough to escape acute danger.  When our stress response becomes overactive due to ongoing worry, uncertainty, or anticipation, this is generally what we call “stress,” or “chronic stress.” 

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3 Techniques to Apply Mindful Parenting

Available for Interviews: Dr. Pete Loper

Dr. Pete Loper, MD, MSEd, FAAP, is a triple board-certified physician in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry. He is also a professor and executive coach and is dedicated to mental health and wellness advocacy.

What Dr. Loper could say on
Mindful Parenting:

  • Put simply, mindfulness is being fully present where your feet are on the ground. Instead of perseverating on the past, or worrying about the future, mindfulness is an active practice of being fully present with one’s thoughts and feelings at the moment. 
  • Mindful parenting is the practice of supporting and responding to your child instead of dictating and reacting to emotions.  It’s about acceptance of the “here and now,” without judgment and as it comes, instead of trying to alter or escape from it.  

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